Fabrics - 3c Carina Polstermöbel Rheda-Wiedenbrück

Fabrics

Fabrics are as different as they are extensive in material design and variety. Modern furniture fabric production makes use of a wide range of different materials. They play a significant part in determining the quality, functional characteristics and look of the upholstery fabric. Upholstery fabrics are made from both natural fibres and man-made fibres. Natural fibres come from plants or animals. Man-made fibres consist of polymers which are either extracted from natural fibres or manufactured synthetically. In addition to the materials used, it is primarily the manufacturing method that is important with upholstery fabrics. The fabric types manufactured using different processes vary both in look and feel and in their properties when in use. 

 

Flatweave

Flatweave is the name for non-pile fabrics. Their surface structure ranges from smooth through to very structured and is often emphasised with fancy yarns or threads or with patterns. This involves the criss–crossing at of least two groups of threads. This manufacturing method lends the fabric its distinctive look and pleasant feel. Properties typical of these fabrics in use are potential pilling formation (formation of little nodules). An ordinary lint razor may help here. Surface roughening and subsequent shading (seat sheen) are unavoidable. With light-coloured fabrics, there is a risk of textile staining (jeans effect). Colour abrasion and/or colour pigment migration is unavoidable when combining light/dark upholstery fabrics. Slight colour variations (particularly with intensive colours) are unavoidable when exposed to UV radiation (direct sunlight). There may be some slight variation in structure and colour when compared with the sample swatch. Threads can be expected to snag if the fabric becomes caught on pointed objects (e.g. rivets on jeans).

 

Microfibre

Microfibre is, as a modern high-tech fibre, a genuine all-rounder that is generally made from polyester or polyamide. This upholstery fabric is made up of millions of microfine fibres. The individual, endlessly long threads/fibres are ten times thinner than the threads produced by a silkworm and are processed to make fine yarns. Fabrics made from microfibre are exceptionally light and yet incredibly hard-wearing, tear resistant and easy to care for. The properties typical of these products in use are possible pilling formation as well as seat sheen and patina formation. With light-coloured fabrics, there is a risk of textile staining (jeans effect). Colour abrasion and/or colour pigment migration is unavoidable when combining light-/dark-coloured upholstery materials. 

Slight colour variations (particularly with intensive colours) are unavoidable when exposed to UV radiation (direct sunlight). There may be some slight variation in structure and colour when compared with the sample swatch. Threads can be expected to snag if the fabric becomes caught on pointed objects (e.g. rivets on jeans). Microfibre is sensitive to liquids, in particular alcohol and solvents. 

 

Chenille

Chenille refers to a textile or knitted fabric with a velvety surface which is made from chenille yarn. The individual chenille thread has a lot of sideways protruding hairs known as the pile. The inner (the so-called soul) of the chenille thread consists of at least two threads which are twisted together (intertwined) during manufacture of the chenille yarn. However, it is not a pure pile fabric - the way in which it is manfactured means it is considered a flatweave. Properties typical of these products in use include potential pilling formation (formation of little nodules). An ordinary lint razor may help here. Surface roughening and subsequent shading (seat sheen) are unavoidable. With light-coloured fabrics, there is a risk of textile staining (jeans effect). Colour abrasion and/or colour pigment migration is unavoidable when combining light-/dark-coloured upholstery materials. Slight colour variations (particularly with intensive colours) are unavoidable when exposed to UV radiation (direct sunlight). There may be some slight variation in structure and colour when compared with the sample swatch. Threads can be expected to snag if the fabric becomes caught on pointed objects (e.g. rivets on jeans).

 

Velours

Velours is the name of a textile product with a velvety surface. Its pleasant feel and special look are without doubt the most prominent features of this fabric. But it is only in use that its real special characteristics come to the fore, all of them properties typical of this product. These include colour shimmer, giving the impression of different colours, changes in pile position (seat sheen) due to the application of pressure, body heat, body moisture and humidity to the fabric. Depending on the way the light falls, all these influences together can result in what look like marks. With light-coloured fabrics, there is a risk of textile staining (jeans effect). Colour abrasion and/or colour pigment migration is unavoidable when combining light -/dark -coloured upholstery materials. Slight colour variations (particularly with intensive colours) are unavoidable when exposed to UV radiation (direct sunlight). There may be some slight variation in structure and colour when compared with the sample swatch.

 

Flock Fabric

Flock fabric is the name for flocked furniture fabrics with a velvety or even suede-like appearance where the pile (flock) is not woven in, but rather fixed onto a textile carrier fabric (e.g. cotton or polyester). The surface is manufactured from man-made fibre filaments. Embossing or swirling the surface results in a range of differently structured finishes. The benefits of this exceptional material are the wide range of colour options and its notable functionality. The properties typical of these fabrics include colour shimmer, giving the impression of different colours, changes in pile position (seat sheen) due to the application of pressure, body heat, body moisture and humidity to the fabric. Depending on the way the light falls, all these influences together can result in what look like marks. With light-coloured fabrics, there is a risk of textile staining (jeans effect). Colour abrasion and/or colour pigment migration is unavoidable when combining light-/dark-coloured upholstery materials. Slight colour variations (particularly with intensive colours) are unavoidable when exposed to UV radiation (direct sunlight). There may be some slight variation in structure and colour when compared with the sample swatch. Flock fabrics are sensitive to liquids, in particular alcohol and solvents.